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Selected Poems of Emily Dickinson (1830 – 1886)

Selected Poems of Emily Dickinson. When you heard about Emily Dickinson, probably you remember one of the famous and the greatest poets in America has ever lived.

Emily Dickinson often uses unique and unconventional/uncommon syntax in her poems. She’s also famous for using the image to explore her feelings especially in a chaotic time (during American Civil War). I suppose this is probably why we see so much pain and thoughts about death in her poems.

selected poems of emily dickinson

Selected Poems of Emily Dickinson

I'm Nobody! Who are You?

I’m Nobody! Who are you?

Poem by Emily Dickinson

 

I’m nobody! Who are you?

Are you nobody, too?

Then there’s a pair of us — don’t tell

They’d banish us, you know.

 

How dreary to be somebody!

How public, like a frog

To tell your name the livelong day

To an admiring bog!

If I Can Stop One Heart from Breaking

If I Can Stop One Heart from Breaking

Poem by Emily Dickinson

 

If I can stop one heart from breaking,

I shall not live in vain;

If I can ease one life the aching,

Or cool one pain,

Or help one fainting robin

Unto his nest again,

I shall not live in vain

A bird came down the walk

A bird came down the walk

Poem by Emily Dickinson

 

If I can stop one heart from breaking,

I shall not live in vain;

If I can ease one life the aching,

Or cool one pain,

Or help one fainting robin

Unto his nest again,

I shall not live in vain

Because I could not stop for Death

Because I could not stop for Death

Poem by Emily Dickinson

 

Because I could not stop for Death,

He kindly stopped for me;

The carriage held but just ourselves

And Immortality

 

We slowly drove, he knew no haste,

And I had put away

My labor, and my leisure too.

For his civility.

 

We passed the school where children played,

Their lessons scarcely done;

We passed the fields of gazing grain,

We passed the setting sun.

 

We paused before a house that seemed

A swelling of the ground;

The roof was scarcely visible,

The cornice but a mound.

 

Since then’t is centuries, but each

Feels shorter than the day

I first surmised the horses’ heads

Were toward eternity.

Hope is the things with feathers

Hope is the things with feathers

Poem by Emily Dickinson

 

Hope is the things with feathers

That perches in the soul,

And sings the tune without the words,

And never stop at all,

 

And sweetest in the gale is heard;

And sore must be the storm

That could abash the little bird

That kept so many warm.

 

I’ve heard it in the chillest land,

And on the strangest sea;

Yet, never, in extremity,

It asked a crumb of me.

I felt a Funeral in my Brain

I felt a funeral in my brain

Poem by Emily Dickinson

 

I felt a Funeral in my Brain,

And Mourners to and fro

Kept treading and treading – till it seemed

That Sense was breaking through

And when they all were seated, 

A service like a drum 

Kept beating, beating, till I thought 

My mind was going numb. 

And then I heard them lift a box, 

And creak across my soul 

With those same boots of lead, again. 

Then space began to toll 

As all the heavens were a bell, 

And Being but an ear, 

And I and silence some strange race, 

Wrecked, solitary, here. 

 

 

I heard a fly buzz when I died

I heard a fly buzz when I died

Poem by Emily Dickinson

 

I heard a fly buzz when I died;

The stillness round my form

Was like the stillness in the air

Between the heaves of storm.

The eyes beside had wrung them dry,

And breaths were gathering sure

For that last onset, when the king

Be witnessed in his power.

I willed my keepsakes, signed away

What portion of me I

Could make assignable, — and then

There interposed a fly,

With blue, uncertain, stumbling buzz,

Between the light and me;

And then the windows failed, and then

I could not see to see.

I like to see it lap the miles

I like to see it lap the miles

Poem by Emily Dickinson

 

I like to see it lap the miles,

And lick the valleys up,

And stop to feed itself at tanks;

And then, prodigious, step

Around a pile of mountains,

And, supercilious, peer

In shanties by the sides of roads;

And then a quarry pare

To fit its sides, and crawl between,

Complaining all the while

In horrid, hooting stanza;

Then chase itself down hill

And neigh like Boanerges;

Then, punctual as a star,

Stop — docile and omnipotent —

At its own stable door.

I taste liquor never brewed

I taste liquor never brewed

Poem by Emily Dickinson

 

I taste a liquor never brewed,

From tankards scooped in pearl;

Not all the vats upon the Rhine

Yield such an alcohol!

Inebriate of air am I,

And debauchee of dew,

Reeling, through endless summer days,

From inns of molten blue.

When landlords turn the drunken bee

Out of the foxglove’s door,

When butterflies renounce their drams,

I shall but drink the more!

Till seraphs swing their snowy hats,

And saints to windows run,

To see the little tippler

Leaning against the sun!

Much madness is divinest sense

Much madness is divinest sense

Poem by Emily Dickinson

 

Much madness is divinest sense

To a discerning eye;

Much sense the starkest madness.

‘T is the majority

In this, as all, prevails.

Assent, and you are sane;

Demur,—you’re straightway dangerous,

And handled with a chain.

My life had stood - a loaded gun

My life had stood – a loaded gun

Poem by Emily Dickinson

 

My Life had stood – a Loaded Gun –

In Corners – till a Day

The Owner passed – identified –

And carried Me away –

And now We roam in Sovreign Woods –

And now We hunt the Doe –

And every time I speak for Him

The Mountains straight reply –

And do I smile, such cordial light

Opon the Valley glow –

It is as a Vesuvian face

Had let it’s pleasure through –

And when at Night – Our good Day done –

I guard My Master’s Head –

’Tis better than the Eider Duck’s

Deep Pillow – to have shared –

To foe of His – I’m deadly foe –

None stir the second time –

On whom I lay a Yellow Eye –

Or an emphatic Thumb –

Though I than He – may longer live

He longer must – than I –

For I have but the power to kill,

Without – the power to die –

Success is counted sweetest

Success is counted sweetest

Poem by Emily Dickinson

 

Success is counted sweetest

By those who ne’er succeed.

To comprehend a nectar

Requires sorest need.

Not one of all the purple Host

Who took the Flag today

Can tell the definition

So clear of victory

As he defeated – dying –

On whose forbidden ear

The distant strains of triumph

Burst agonized and clear!

Tell all the truth but tell it slant

Tell all the truth but tell it slant

Poem by Emily Dickinson

 

Tell all the truth but tell it slant —

Success in Circuit lies

Too bright for our infirm Delight

The Truth’s superb surprise

As Lightning to the Children eased

With explanation kind

The Truth must dazzle gradually

Or every man be blind —

There is another sky

There is another sky

Poem by Emily Dickinson

 

There is another sky,

Ever serene and fair,

And there is another sunshine,

Though it be darkness there;

Never mind faded forests, Austin,

Never mind silent fields—

Here is a little forest,

Whose leaf is ever green;

Here is a brighter garden,

Where not a frost has been;

In its unfading flowers

I hear the bright bee hum:

Prithee, my brother,

Into my garden come!

There is no frigate like book

There is no frigate like book

Poem by Emily Dickinson

 

There is no Frigate like a Book

To take us Lands away

Nor any Coursers like a Page

Of prancing Poetry –

This Traverse may the poorest take

Without oppress of Toll –

How frugal is the Chariot

That bears the Human Soul –

Wild nights! Wild nights!

Wild nights! Wild nights!

Poem by Emily Dickinson

 

Wild nights! Wild nights!

Were I with thee?

Wild nights should be

Our luxury!

 

Futile the winds

To a heart i port, —

Done with the compass,

Done with the chart.

 

Rowing in Eden!

Ah! the sea!

Might I but moor

To-night in thee!

Emily Dickinson, getty Images
Emily Dickinson. Source: Getty Images.

Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson was born in Amherst, Massachussets, on December 10,1830 to Edward and Emily (Norcross) Dickinson. Her father was an ambitious lawyer, active in politic and has served a single term as representative from Massachusetts to the U.S Congress.

 

Emily has 2 Siblings, the older brother William Austin Dickinson and the younger sister Lavinia Norcross Dickinson. They attended the one-room primary school in Amherst and then later the girls moved to Amherst Academy and William was sent to Williston Seminary.

 

Emily was delighted in all aspects of the schools. The schools prided itself on its connection with Amherst College. They offering students regular attendance at college lectures in all the principal subjects — astronomy, botany, chemistry, geology, mathematics, natural history, natural philosophy, and zoology.

 

Those subjects has grown Emily’s observation and interest in “chemic force” and it also contributed to her development as a poet. She spent 7 years in this academy and left at the age of 15 in order to pursue higher education.

 

In the fall of 1847 she entered Mount Holyoke Female Seminary. This education has impacted her views of the world in religious way. Her departure from this school marked the end of her formal schooling.

 

Emily Dickinson died unmarried in Amherst in 1886. After her death, her family members found her hand-sen books, contained nearly 1.800 poems. This complete volume did not appear until 1955 edited by Thomas H. Johnson although Mabel Loomis Todd and Higginson published the first selection of her poems in 1890. In 1998 R.W.Franklin published her restored poems.

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Baca juga: 10 Prosa Pilihan Love Looks Pretty on You

 

Baca juga terjemahan puisi Emily Dickinson

Beberapa puisi Emily Dickinson yang saya terjemahkan lainnya, antara lain:

A bird came down the walk

Because I could not stop for Death

Hope is the things with feathers

I felt a funeral in my brain

I heard a fly buzz when I died

If I can stop one heart from breaking

I like to see it lap the miles

I taste liquor never brewed

I’m nobody! Who are you?

Much madness is divinest sense

My life had stood – a loaded gun

Success is counted sweetest

Tell all the truth but tell it slant

There is another sky

There is no frigate like book

Wild nights – Wild nights!

Referensi

The Poems of Emily Dickinson: Reading Edition, The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press 1998

Emily Dickinson, Wikipedia.

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